Re-Membering and Surviving: African American Fiction of the Vietnam War

In this episode, we’re joined by Shirley A. James Hanshaw to discuss her book, Re-Membering and Surviving: African American Fiction of the Vietnam War, which Yusef Komunyakaa calls "a powerful call seeking a response."

In the words of Yusef Komunyakaa, Shirley A. James Hanshaw’s Re-Membering and Surviving is a powerful call seeking a response. This superb analytical voice examines literature by four black writers—John A. Williams, Wesley Brown, A. R. Flowers, and George Davis—who are masterful storytellers shaped by the caldron of war. Through her attention to these figures, Hanshaw reveals an American voice that has been kept in obscurity. Here, the historical background illuminates a postmodern imagination. As Jay Watson puts it, “This is an invaluable work that will kindle important scholarship about the Black war experience and its literary representation for years to come. A vital contribution to African American literary criticism and literary history.”

Shirley A. James Hanshaw is professor emerita in the English Department at Mississippi State University where she was instrumental in establishing the first African American Studies Program. She is the recipient of a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, a Danforth Associateship for Outstanding Teaching in the Sciences and Humanities, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship.

Re-Membering and Surviving: African American Fiction of the Vietnam War, is available at msupress.org and other fine booksellers. You can connect with the press on Facebook and @msupress on Twitter, where you can also find me @kurtmilb.

The MSU Press podcast is a joint production of MSU Press and the College of Arts & Letters at Michigan State University. Thanks to Daniel Trego, Madiha Ghous, Kylene Cave, and the team at MSU Press, especially Elise Jajuga and Julie Reaume, for helping to produce this podcast. Our theme music is “Coffee” by Cambo. 

MSU Press